Infrared saunas



  • I know of someone who recovered from CFS after being housebound/bed bound for a couple of years. They believe infrared saunas might have helped. Has anyone here had any experiences they could share? I haven't tried them yet myself, been meaning to for a while, but I tend to burn up when I'm at my worst, so I'm not sure they will be great. I've tried normal saunas but they leave me feeling drained.



  • @hayden I bought an infrared sau

    • I bought one a year ago and think it has helped me. I did not buy the most expensive brand. I started out for short burst and lower temps. I use it intermittently and use on days when I am feeling up to it. I had a noticeable improvement in my hand and muscle pain. Think it has helped with immune issues as well.


  • @Lisa Hi Lisa, that's interesting to hear. I still haven't had a chance to try one. Do you heat up and sweat a lot like a normal sauna?



  • I think anything that heats you up is a no-no if you meet POTS criteria. I can't even handle the bathroom steaming up when I shower, I have to leave all the doors open or I feel like I'm going to suffocate.



  • @hayden said in Infrared saunas:

    I know of someone who recovered from CFS after being housebound/bed bound for a couple of years. They believe infrared saunas might have helped. Has anyone here had any experiences they could share? I haven't tried them yet myself, been meaning to for a while, but I tend to burn up when I'm at my worst, so I'm not sure they will be great. I've tried normal saunas but they leave me feeling drained.

    Hey Hayden and People,
    it depends a bit on each person. Some people are cold, some are normal, some are hot.
    If you found a dry sauna draining then an infrared sauna is in the same category, but it would be more controllable in your own home than in a public pool setting, so it could be OK.

    I used to go daily to the local leisure centre and use both saunas, but I'm a very cold person and like humidity more so I preferred the wet sauna more, but if I had the choice between no sauna and a dry or infrared one, I'd take the sauna.

    So many benefits as far as core temperature, muscles, joints, stress relief etc. but for POTS people not recommended.
    Saunas are not usually meant for long sessions (over 15-20 mins.) generally as they can be dangerous as far dehydration etc.
    Some people find alternating the sauna with a cool or cold water bath/shower to really 'revive' them and get the heart going, but it can be too much for ME/CFS people.

    I remember walking home in the dark and it sometimes felt like I was 'walking in sand', but I was warm and relaxed, so it was a trade-off.
    The warming of the core temperature, circulation etc. helps with digestion too, so it's helpful in many ways.


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